Not About What Doris Day Sang About

“To be able to put oneself in another’s position,

to be able to see and feel as another person does, that is the rare gift.”

Mata Amritanandamayi

What do you want to be in the future? I want to be an engineer, a doctor, a business man, and you? I want to be Power Ranger. But my point here is not about being Power Ranger, it is simply about the dream I told with the light in my eyes, that I don’t think every kid can do today. Something has stolen. We will do a little flashback to my childhood; I can say I had a very happy childhood. I went to school, played with friends and pretended that we were Power Rangers or Digimon Masters, got wet, picnic, and sang so many children’s songs. Just like any other kids, we talked about how our future would be, what we would do, and it would end up with singing ‘Que Sera Sera, Whatever Will Be, Will Be, The Future’s Not Ours to See, Que Sera Sera’ out loud. Yeah, that Doris Day’s song is my favorite. When I aspire to be an architect is my dream, some kids out there horribly think that their dream is ‘to aspire’ itself. I realized that it is not Doris Day era anymore, but in fact those people sing her song in their daily life, just let their future become whatever it will be. This is nowadays lifestyle for some people in this cruel world.

I have been experiencing how it feels like to go to school without thinking about an opinion that the poor may not go to school. I have experienced how it feels to be Ultraman, or Spy Kid without being afraid of sudden bomb above my head, and I can still have my meals at least twice a day. Not only to go to school, even to go to play with their friends they have to think a few times. It is so absurd, why? Because from my early childhood, I, we, had been taught to embrace the idea that everyone deserves an equal chance.  I can really imagine how my days would be without them all, how your stomach is more important than your school and future imagination. It is awful if the things you had to do was only look for anything to hold on to survive today, and that Mama was sick and waiting for your money at home to be brought to the clinic that doesn’t want to handle her because she is poor, black, and a Moslem.

It is not the future that I imagined with my friends, and the future we want is when they can experience the happiness they should have been experiencing, when the world is more healthier, has more opportunities, better educated, more appreciates the differences, more connected, with less inequality, oh not less, it should be with NO inequality, and when we know that sustainable is not only an abstract concept of a newspaper’s headline, but when we can see and experience the sustainable itself. And my personal goal is to see the light of happiness in every single person’s eyes. So it is about empathy. To make my vision about the future comes true, I (we) have to start trying to walk on another’s path. If we don’t go where they have gone, we can’t truly understand what that person is experiencing, and then we will never start to care and to make a change. We just have to pretend to be in an Olympic which requires us to relay our sympathy to other person to make the circle of peace.

From now on, we must stop applying Doris Day’s song into our lives. Because today’s life is not about what Doris Day sang about. We must start to think about our future and don’t let it be “whatever will be, will be”. Future is like a light, sometimes it is dim, but hey! It does exist there. Mother Theresa says “To keep a lamp burning we have to keep putting oil in it” so all we need is to keep putting oil to make our future keep burning and bright to be the future we want. Something right about Doris day’s song is yeah the future is not ours to see, but hey, the future is ours to create.

This entry was published on June 20, 2012 at 6:00 pm and is filed under Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

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